AS Film Studies – FM2: British & American Cinema

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AS Film Studies Intro to FM2

AS Film 09/10 Micro Analysis Essay Titles

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Joseph Allen – The Terminal (2004)

How does Cinematography & Mise-en-Scene create meaning & identity for the Audience, in an extract from ‘The Terminal’ (2004)?

Lucy Barrett – The Notebook (2004)

How do Sound & Performance create meaning for the Audience, in an extract from ‘The Notebook’ (2004)?

Louise Bone – 13 Going on 30 (2004)

How does Performance & Sound create a response in the Audience, within an extract from ’13 Going on 30’ (2004)?

Karis Bull-Welch – True Romance (1993)

How does Sound, Performance & Editing create a response from the Audience, in an extract from ‘True Romance’ (1993)?

Matthew Cowlin – School of Rock (2003)

How is Performance, Cinematography & Sound used to create a response from the Audience, in an extract from ‘School of Rock’ (2003)?

Daniella Crowley – Thirteen (2003)

How  does Cinematography & Sound create a response from the Audience, within an extract from ‘Thirteen’ (2003)?

Joe Currie – The Deer Hunter (1978)

How does Performance, Mise-en-scene & Cinematography create a response from the Audience, in an extract from ‘The Deer Hunter’ (1978)?

Poppy Dolan-Miller – Kidulthood (2006)

How does Performance, Mise-en-scene & Cinematography create a response from the Audience, in the final scene from ‘Kidulthood’ (2006)?

Darrell Duhy – Saving Private Ryan (1998)

How does Cinematography & Performance create a response from the Audience, in the Omaha Beach landing from the film ‘Saving Private Ryan’ (1998)?

Joe Fitzpatrick – Kill Bill: Vol.1 (2003)

How does Performance, Cinematography & Sound create a response from the Audience, in the fight scene from ‘Kill Bill: Vol.1’ (2003)?

Christopher Gale – Saving Private Ryan (1998)

How do Sound & Performance create meaning for the Audience, in an extract from ‘Saving Private Ryan’(1998)?

Lauren Graham – The Butterfly Effect (2004)

How does Editing & Performance create a response from the Audience, in an extract from ‘The Butterfly Effect’ (2004)?

Kurt Groves – The Strangers

How does Cinematography, Sound & Performance provoke a reaction from the Audience, in an extract from the film ‘The Strangers’?

Lillie Hand – Taken

How do Performance & Sound create meaning for the Audience in the opening extract of ‘Taken’?

Shauna Harrendence – Into the Wild (2007)

How does Performance & Cinematography create meaning for the Audience, in an extract from ‘Into the Wild’ (2007)?

Anthony Howell – The Dark Knight (2008)

How does Cinematography & Performance creates a response from the Audience, from an extract of ‘The Dark Knight’ (2008)?

Caroline Rainbow – Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971)

How does Performance, Mise-en-scene & Sound create an alternative meaning to the Audience, within an extract of ‘Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory’ (1971)?

Samantha Rance – Van Helsing (2004)

How does Mise-en-scene & Cinematography create meaning to the Audience, during the opening sequence to ‘Van Helsing’ (2004)?

Charlotte Ruffles – Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004)

How does Cinematography & Sound create a response in the Audience, in an extract from ‘Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban’ (2004)?

Lauren Emma Smith – Moulin Rouge

How does Cinematography, Mise-en-scene & Performance create a response from the Audience in the ‘El Tango de Roxanne’ scene in Moulin Rouge?

Rebekah Taylor – Road to Perdition (2003)

How does Cinematography, Sound & Performance create a response from the Audience, in an extract from ‘Road to Perdition’?

Amber Titterton – House of Flying Daggers (2004)

How does Performance, Sound & Mise-en-scene provoke a response from the Audience, in an extract from ‘House of Flying Daggers’ (2004)?

Laura Walsh – I Am Legend (2007)

How does Sound & Cinematography create a response from the Audience, in an extract from ‘I Am Legend’ (2007)?

George Whitworth – Reservoir Dogs (1992)

How does Performance, Cinematography & Mise-en-scene create a response from the Audience, in an extract from ‘Reservoir Dogs’ (1992)?

Web 2.0… What Is It?

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Web 2.0” is commonly associated with web development and web design that facilitates interactive information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design and collaboration on the World Wide Web. Examples of Web 2.0 include web-based communities, hosted services, web applications, social-networking sites, video-sharing sites, wikis, blogs, mashups and folksonomies. A Web 2.0 site allows its users to interact with other users or to change website content, in contrast to non-interactive websites where users are limited to the passive viewing of information that is provided to them. - In fact, this information is from a site that could be considered a part of Web 2.0 – Wikipedia – where users have a major input into the content and functioning of the site!!

The term is closely associated with Tim O’Reilly because of the O’Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in 2004. Although the term suggests a new version of the World Wide Web, it does not refer to an update to any technical specifications, but rather to cumulative changes in the ways software developers and end-users use the Web. Whether Web 2.0 is qualitatively different from prior web technologies has been challenged by World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee who called the term a “piece of jargon”.

 

The term “Web 2.0″ was coined by Darcy DiNucci in 1999. In her article “Fragmented Future,” she writes

The Web we know now, which loads into a browser window in essentially static screenfuls, is only an embryo of the Web to come. The first glimmerings of Web 2.0 are beginning to appear, and we are just starting to see how that embryo might develop The Web will be understood not as screenfuls of text and graphics but as a transport mechanism, the ether through which interactivity happens. It will [...] appear on your computer screen, [...] on your TV set [...] your car dashboard [...] your cell phone [...] hand-held game machines [...] and maybe even your microwave.

Her use of the term deals mainly with Web design and aesthetics; she argues that the Web is “fragmenting” due to the widespread use of portable Web-ready devices. Her article is aimed at designers, reminding them to code for an ever-increasing variety of hardware. As such, her use of the term hints at – but does not directly relate to – the current uses of the term.

The term did not resurface until 2003. These authors focus on the concepts currently associated with the term where, as Scott Dietzen puts it, “the Web becomes a universal, standards-based integration platform.”

In 2004, the term began its rise in popularity when O’Reilly Media and MediaLive hosted the first Web 2.0 conference. In their opening remarks, John Batelle and Tim O’Reilly outlined their definition of the “Web as Platform,” where software applications are built upon the Web as opposed to upon the desktop. The unique aspect of this migration, they argued, is that “customers are building your business for you.” They argued that the activities of users generating content (in the form of ideas, text, videos, or pictures) could be “harnessed” to create value. According to Tim O’Reilly: 

Web 2.0 is the business revolution in the computer industry caused by the move to the Internet as a platform, and an attempt to understand the rules for success on that new platform.

From there, the term Web 2.0 was largely championed by bloggers and by technology journalists, culminating in the 2006 TIME magazine Person of The Year – “You.” That is, TIME selected the masses of users who were participating in content creation on social networks, blogs, wikis, and media sharing sites. The cover story author Lev Grossman explains:

It’s a story about community and collaboration on a scale never seen before. It’s about the cosmic compendium of knowledge Wikipedia and the million-channel people’s network YouTube and the online metropolis MySpace. It’s about the many wresting power from the few and helping one another for nothing and how that will not only change the world, but also change the way the world changes.

Coursework Deadline Dates!!

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All dates are set for the academic year 2009-2010. Dates refer to week commencing – your actual deadline is during your timetabled practical session in that week.

AS Media – Foundation Portfolio

Preliminary Task

28th September – Presentation of Final Creative Ideas
12th October – Deadline for Planning & Research
30th November – Deadline for Production
7th December – Deadline for Evaluation & Submission of Preliminary Task

Main Task

4th January – Presentation of Final Creative Ideas
18th January – Deadline for Planning & Research
15th March – Deadline for Production
29th March – Deadline for Evaluation & Submission of Main Task

A2 Media – Advanced Portfolio

12th October – Presentation of Final Creative Ideas
9th November – Deadline for Pre-Production
8th March – Deadline for Production
22nd March – Deadline for Post-Production & Evaluation
29th March – Final Deadline for submission of Advaced Portfolio

AS Film – Creative Project

19th October – Deadline for submission of Aims & Contexts
7th December – Deadline for Pre-Production
15th February – Deadline for Production
8th March – Deadline for Post-Production
15th March – Deadline Reflective Analysis Draft One
29th March – Deadline Reflective Analysis Draft Two & Final Submission of Creative Project
* In addition, you will be advised on a one-to-one basis as to deadlines for submission of drafts for Micro Analysis Essay

Introduction to A2 Film Studies Unit FM4: Varieties of Film Experience

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A2 Film Studies FM4 Intro PowerPoint

Introduction to A2 Film Studies Unit FM3: Film Research & Creative Projects

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A2 Film Studies FM3 Intro PowerPoint

Introduction to New Look A2 Media Studies OCR Spec – G325: Critical Perspectives in Media

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A2 Media Studies Intro PowerPoint

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